Tools Of The Trade – Baitcasting Rods

In this technological age, high-performance specialty rods have become the norm. What you fish for will determine which rod characteristics you need to fish effectively. Many anglers prefer baitcasters for bigger fish.

Baitcasting rods are designed with the reel and guides on the top and a trigger grip on the bottom for stability when casting and fighting fish.

If you plan to use any of the superlines, choose ceramic or nickel titanium guides. They’re the most abrasion resistant. The action of a rod refers to its casting performance with different sizes and weights of lures, and how it reels in fish.

A fast-action rod has the flex in the top 1/3 of the rod and is great for quick hooksets when jigging, for example.

Medium-action rods have their flex typically through the middle section and are good for medium-sized crankbaits and long distance casts with smaller baits.

If you like to use live bait, the slow-action rod provides long, gentle casts.

These rods can do way more than I just described so, ultimately, it’s about personal preference and what feels good in your hands.

Pete Bowman

2 Replies to “Tools Of The Trade – Baitcasting Rods”

  1. Robert Ray “Rod” Roddy (September 28, 1937 – October 27, 2003) was an American radio and television announcer. He was primarily known for his role as an offstage announcer on game shows. Among the shows that he announced are the CBS game shows Whew! and Press Your Luck. He is widely recognized by the signature line, “Come on down!” from The Price Is Right, and it appears on his grave marker, although the phrase was originated and made popular by his predecessor Johnny Olson. Roddy succeeded original announcer Olson on The Price Is Right and held the role from 1986 until his death in 2003, and as of 2020, is the longest-serving announcer on the current incarnation of the show. On many episodes of Press Your Luck and The Price Is Right, Roddy appeared on camera. He was also the voice of Mike the microphone on Disney’s House of Mouse from 2001 until his death in 2003.

    As it appears, “Rod” Roddy did in all aspects precede Pete “Bowrod” Bowman’s moniker. But Let’s not forget, Johnny Olsen’s “come on down” mantra is a testament to the fact, all three of these men were and are, on top of their game.

    So, who want’s to “Come On down” :

    As Pete has suggested, finding the best bait casting rod is not always easy. If you don’t match your rod and reel to the weight of line you intend to fish with then your casting will suffer. Its not just your casting that might pose problems, you may also have either too powerful or too weak a rod for your intended fish species.

    So without further ado, “A Baitcasting Rod Buyers Guide” :

    Length​ :
    Baitcasting rods are generally longer in length than a spinning rod. The extra length allows you to get more power out of the rod as it acts as a bigger level. To get more power out you have to put more power in so and if you are casting with fairly large lures you will need to give it a bit more muscle to load the rod blank and get the power out of its natural spring.

    A good length is usually ​for an intermediate setup is somewhere from 7 feet upwards. If you are using a lighter setup then you can go a little smaller. The bigger length of rods are reserved for much heavier tackle anywhere around the 9 foot mark.

    Power​ :

    Power is generally referred to how much strength the rod blank has. This will have a direct effect on how big a fish you can play. It also affects the choice of line strength to a lesser degree.

    Fishing rod power is ​usually described in the following way:

    * Ultralight – used for very light tackle and lure applications
    * Light – a step up in terms of tackle from the ultra.
    * Medium – medium can be a good all round choice if you can only afford one rod.
    * Medium/Heavy – bigger freshwater species.
    * Heavy – Larger species particularly saltwater​.

    Action​ :

    The action of a fishing rod describes how sensitive and how the power is distributed down through the rod blank from the tip to the butt.​

    * Fast action – ​The majority of the bend in the rod happens in the top one third closest to the tip. A fast action rod will allow for much greater sensitivity and quicker hook sets at the expense of casting distance.
    * Moderate action – the moderate action rod will start to bend in the middle third of the rod. They are a good all round choice. Usually used for crankbaits and slightly longer casts.
    * Slow action – Slow action rods are good for casting distance as you can get all the power out of the full blank. They tend to start bending lower down than the other two are are good for using when fishing with natural bait.

    Handle​ :

    Handles can come in either cork, EVA foam or rubber. Each fisherman will have their own preference. A cork handle will be softer but might retain a bit of heat in the winter. A split grip rod is best suited to casting as you can use the full rod length to generate the swing.​

    Material​ :

    The materials that a rod blank is built from is usually either fiberglass or graphite and occasionally you will see a blend of the two. Fiberglass rods are generally more durable than and can take a bit more abuse before they will break. They are also less sensitive. Graphite rods tend to be much more sensitive and lighter than fiberglass. The majority of high end fishing rods are built from graphite or some exotic blend with carbon fiber.​

    Guides :

    Line guides are usually built from a metal frame and can have either ceramic inserts of a aluminum oxide. As Pete mentioned, choose carefully when considering what type of line you intend to use.

    In conclusion, the best advice I can offer you when in the market for a Bait Casting rod, is to drop Pete Bowman or Angelo Viola a line at pbowman@fishncanada.com or angelo@fishncanada.com They will have all the answers.

  2. As it appears, “Rod” Roddy did in all aspects precede Pete “Bowrod” Bowman’s moniker, but let’s not forget, Johnny Olsen’s “come on down” mantra is a testament to the fact, all three of these men were and are, on top of their game.

    So, who want’s to “Come On down”? :

    As Pete has suggested, finding the best bait casting rod is not always easy. If you don’t match your rod and reel to the weight of line you intend to fish with then your casting will suffer. Its not just your casting that might pose problems, you may also have either too powerful or too weak a rod for your intended fish species.

    A Baitcasting Rod Buyers Guide :

    Length​ :
    Baitcasting rods are generally longer in length than a spinning rod. The extra length allows you to get more power out of the rod as it acts as a bigger level. To get more power out you have to put more power in so and if you are casting with fairly large lures you will need to give it a bit more muscle to load the rod blank and get the power out of its natural spring.

    A good length is usually ​for an intermediate setup is somewhere from 7 feet upwards. If you are using a lighter setup then you can go a little smaller. The bigger length of rods are reserved for much heavier tackle anywhere around the 9 foot mark.

    Power​ :

    Power is generally referred to how much strength the rod blank has. This will have a direct effect on how big a fish you can play. It also affects the choice of line strength to a lesser degree.

    Fishing rod power is ​usually described in the following way:

    * Ultralight – used for very light tackle and lure applications
    * Light – a step up in terms of tackle from the ultra.
    * Medium – medium can be a good all round choice if you can only afford one rod.
    * Medium/Heavy – bigger freshwater species.
    * Heavy – Larger species particularly saltwater​.

    Action​ :

    The action of a fishing rod describes how sensitive and how the power is distributed down through the rod blank from the tip to the butt.​

    * Fast action – ​The majority of the bend in the rod happens in the top one third closest to the tip. A fast action rod will allow for much greater sensitivity and quicker hook sets at the expense of casting distance.
    * Moderate action – the moderate action rod will start to bend in the middle third of the rod. They are a good all round choice. Usually used for crankbaits and slightly longer casts.
    * Slow action – Slow action rods are good for casting distance as you can get all the power out of the full blank. They tend to start bending lower down than the other two are are good for using when fishing with natural bait.

    Handle​ :

    Handles can come in either cork, EVA foam or rubber. Each fisherman will have their own preference. A cork handle will be softer but might retain a bit of heat in the winter. A split grip rod is best suited to casting as you can use the full rod length to generate the swing.​

    Material​ :

    The materials that a rod blank is built from is usually either fiberglass or graphite and occasionally you will see a blend of the two. Fiberglass rods are generally more durable than and can take a bit more abuse before they will break. They are also less sensitive. Graphite rods tend to be much more sensitive and lighter than fiberglass. The majority of high end fishing rods are built from graphite or some exotic blend with carbon fiber.​

    Guides :

    Line guides are usually built from a metal frame and can have either ceramic inserts of a aluminum oxide. As Pete mentioned, choose carefully when considering what type of line you intend to use.

    In conclusion, the best advice I can offer you when in the market for a Bait Casting rod, is to drop Pete Bowman or Angelo Viola a line. They will have all the answers.

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