Garmin® enters the freshwater trolling motor market with Force

OLATHE, Kan./July 8, 2019/Business Wire – Garmin International, Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ:GRMN), the world’s leading marine electronics manufacturer1 today announced its new Force™ Trolling Motor, bringing superior power and efficiency to the freshwater trolling motor market. More power and efficiency means anglers can cover more area and stay on their spots longer, even in tough conditions—and without spooking the fish. Thanks to its unique brushless motor, Force operates with almost undetectable levels of sonar and steering noise both below and above the water. It’s also the first trolling motor to include built-in industry-leading Garmin CHIRP traditional and Ultra High-Definition ClearVü and SideVü scanning sonars.

“The trolling motor is one of the most critical pieces of equipment on a freshwater fishing boat, and it can single-handedly be the difference between a good or bad day on the water,” said Dan Bartel, Garmin worldwide vice president of consumer sales. “As a new player in the trolling motor market, Garmin is dedicated to delivering a motor that’s as innovative as it is reliable, yet still whisper quiet. Not only is the Force trolling motor at the forefront of power and efficiency, its robust, reliable design was built to withstand strenuous use, season after season, and the result is a trolling motor that’s second to none.”

Quiet, powerful and efficient  

 

Anglers with Garmin Force get the best of all three. Thanks to its quiet brushless motor, Force operates with nearly imperceptible sonar noise interference. It’s extremely quiet above water, too, without compromise in performance. In fact, the Force trolling motor is 30% more powerful2 than existing freshwater trolling motors on the market today. It can move anglers from one dock or brush pile to the next more quickly, throttle back with ease when they need to fish slow, and stand up better to winds and currents. Even with all that power, Force is also the most efficient trolling motor available, so anglers can count on it to fish all day. Its high-efficiency brushless motor operates at either 36V or 24V. When running at 24V, Force delivers comparable thrust to competitors’ 36V motors. It’s everything anglers want in a trolling motor and more.

 

Integrated Ultra High-Definition sonar

Anglers with Garmin Force get the best of all three. Thanks to its quiet brushless motor, Force operates with nearly imperceptible sonar noise interference. It’s extremely quiet above water, too, without compromise in performance. In fact, the Force trolling motor is 30% more powerful2 than existing freshwater trolling motors on the market today. It can move anglers from one dock or brush pile to the next more quickly, throttle back with ease when they need to fish slow, and stand up better to winds and currents. Even with all that power, Force is also the most efficient trolling motor available, so anglers can count on it to fish all day. Its high-efficiency brushless motor operates at either 36V or 24V. When running at 24V, Force delivers comparable thrust to competitors’ 36V motors. It’s everything anglers want in a trolling motor and more.

 

The complete system for precise boat control 

 

Wireless integration with a Garmin chartplotter and built-in autopilot functionality allow anglers with Force to get to the fish faster and stay in that same location while they fish. Thanks to its integrated heading sensor and GPS, Force offers precise virtual anchor lock to help anglers lock their boat onto their fishing spot quickly and with accuracy. From the chartplotter, users can create routes to their favorite waypoint and follow tracks while they go. Anglers can set their track, or select a suggested Auto Guidance3 route, and the Force will move them along the course.

 

Force includes a convenient wireless foot pedal that provides instant control and responsiveness yet feels and steers like a cable-steered pedal. The pedal resistance is adjustable, and features foot-actuated buttons to control speed, heading and anchor lock. It can be operated wirelessly using AA batteries, or with the included power cable for wired power installation. When battery-operated, the wireless foot pedal will remain charged through one year of typical fishing use.

 

What’s more, Force can also be controlled from anywhere on the boat via the included wireless remote. The remote gives anglers complete control of the trolling motor with precise virtual anchor lock, autopilot functionality, and simple point-and-go gesture steering and includes user-programmable keys for remote chartplotter control—plus it floats!

 

A reputation of reliability and award-winning support

 

Garmin has a long-standing commitment to build products that offer a compelling design and superior quality, and its Force trolling motor is no exception. As the world’s leading marine electronics manufacturer, Garmin has been recognized for four consecutive years as the Manufacturer of the Year by the National Marine Electronics Association (NMEA), an honor given to the most recognized marine electronics company for support of products in the field. Led by decades of marine industry expertise and innovation, Force is built to last— it’s rugged and durable, yet easy to deploy and retract and stow with dual-gas shocks. It’s backed by a 3-year warranty and a limited lifetime warranty on the shaft, along with support through an ever-increasing servicing dealer network.

 

The Force trolling motor is being unveiled at the International Convention of Allied Sportfishing Trades (ICAST), in Orlando, Fla., July 10-12, where it will be on display in booth #4800. Expected to be available in August 2019, it will be offered with a 50-inch or 57-inch adjustable shaft for suggested retail prices of $3099.99 and $3199.99, respectively. For more information, visit www.garmin.com/force.

 

Garmin’s portfolio includes some of the industry’s most sophisticated chartplotters and touchscreen multifunction displays, sonar technology, high-definition radar, autopilots, high-resolution mapping, sailing instrumentation, audio, entertainment and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and ease-of-use. Other Garmin marine brands include FUSION® Entertainment, Navionics–a premier supplier of electronic charts, and EmpirBus.

 

For decades, Garmin has pioneered new GPS navigation and wireless devices and applications that are designed for people who live an active lifestyle. Garmin serves five primary markets, including automotive, aviation, fitness, marine, and outdoor recreation. For more information, visit Garmin’s virtual pressroom at garmin.com/newsroom, contact the Media Relations department at 913-397-8200, or follow us at facebook.com/garmin, twitter.com/garmin, instagram.com/garmin or youtube.com/garmin.

 

1 Based on 2017 reported sales.

2 In compliance with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) requirements for small craft static thrust.

3 Auto Guidance is for planning purposes only and does not replace safe navigation operations.

 

About Garmin International Inc. Garmin International Inc. is a subsidiary of Garmin Ltd. (Nasdaq: GRMN). Garmin Ltd. is incorporated in Switzerland, and its principal subsidiaries are located in the United States, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. Garmin is a registered trademark and Force, Panoptix, and Panoptix LiveScope are trademarks of Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries. All other brands, product names, company names, trademarks and service marks are the properties of their respective owners. All rights reserved.

 

2 Replies to “Garmin® enters the freshwater trolling motor market with Force”

  1. What’s up?

    No offence guys and with all due respect to the Trolling Motor industry, but my challenge was meant to be challenged. Muddying the confluences with additional nomenclature only adds to the confusing that already exists.

    Allow me to reiterate the details and my challenge :

    “Sonar (originally an acronym for SOund NAvigation and Ranging). It is a technique that uses sound propagation (usually underwater, as in submarine navigation) to navigate, communicate with or detect objects on or under the surface of the water, such as other vessels. Two types of technology share the name “sonar”: passive sonar is essentially listening for the sound made by vessels; active sonar is emitting pulses of sounds and listening for echoes. Sonar may be used as a means of acoustic location and of measurement of the echo characteristics of “targets” in the water.”

    “Therefore without further ado and knowing full well that manufactures of Fish Finding Electronics specifically state that these units should NEVER be used for navigational purposes, I would like to challenge all anglers and every manufacturer of marine technology to prove these units do transmit any type of audible sound.”

    Today’s article fails to understand the concept behind the sonar technology.

    We all know that any type of electronic equipment does produce radio waves (static) specifically between the brushes and commutator in motors of several different frequencies. The wires contained in these units produce magnetic fields when electricity passes through them. That’s High School 101.

    They do and will interfere with Fish Finders as the article states. Other than that, the similarity stops there. So, I will ask again. Please prove to me beyond any shadow of a doubt that Fish Finders do propagate audible sound for detecting underwater targets.

    The definition of Sonar Transducer is a device that converts energy from one form to another. The transducer converts a signal in one form of energy (electrical) to a signal in another (sound).

    The transducers are often employed at the boundaries of automation, measurement, and control systems, where electrical signals are converted to and from other physical quantities (energy, force, torque, light, motion, position, etc.). The process of converting one form of energy to another is known as transduction. Radio waves and sound waves cannot co-exist in this matter.

    Again I ask, “Does the so called transducer on a Fish Finder convert electrical energy into audible sound waves? Somewhat like the speakers on your computer! A simple no would suffice!

    So Lads ans Lasses, the challenge remains. Please prove to me beyond any shadow of a doubt that Fish Finders do propagate audible sound for detecting underwater targets.

    Remember : “One’s ability to cipher a numeric code is not in the mathematical equation itself, but in one’s own intelligence to perceive the unknown.”

  2. While we are at it, here is a little scientific fact for you to mull over while considering how to best reply to my challenge that Fish Finders do not propagate (produce) sound.

    Unknown to many, sonar is actually detrimental to many forms of marine life being that it interferes with their own natural sonar. Mammals such as whales, dolphins and the like use their sonar (squeaks and grunts) to communicate among themselves and to locate prey. The sound they produce can travel for several miles/kilometres. Water in this instance is an excellent conductor of sound waves.

    Fish of every species are also super sensitive to sound. Detecting vibrations is one of their main means of defence and communication. Boat motors and other noise produced from moving around in your vessel will cause them to panic and scatter, as we are all aware.

    Point of Order : Hearing is an important sensory system for most species of fish. Hearing threshold and the ability to localize sound sources are reduced underwater, in which the speed of sound is faster than in air. Underwater hearing is by bone conduction, and localization of sound appears to depend on differences in amplitude detected by bone conduction. As such, aquatic animals such as fish have a more specialized hearing apparatus that is effective underwater.

    Fish can sense sound through their lateral lines and their otoliths (ears). Some fishes, such as some species of carp and herring, hear through their swim bladders, which function rather like a hearing aid.

    Hearing is well-developed in carp, which have the Weberian organ, three specialized vertebral processes that transfer vibrations in the swim bladder to the inner ear.

    Although it is hard to test sharks’ hearing, they may have a sharp sense of hearing and can possibly hear prey many miles away. A small opening on each side of their heads (not the spiracle) leads directly into the inner ear through a thin channel. The lateral line shows a similar arrangement, and is open to the environment via a series of openings called lateral line pores. This is a reminder of the common origin of these two vibration- and sound-detecting organs that are grouped together as the acoustico-lateralis system. In bony fish and tetrapods the external opening into the inner ear has been lost.

    Now with those facts in mind, if these manufacturers of marine electronic technology truly believe their products are indeed sonar, these units would in fact repel every species of fish known to man. It would make impossible to catch fish rendering these units useless.

    So in conclusion….I can’t hear you !!

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