Motorguide Introduces true cable steer motor with GPS anchor

LOWELL, Mich. (July 9, 2019) – MotorGuide has announced the introduction of two new revolutionary and industry-leading trolling motors today, Tour and Tour Pro, at ICAST in Orlando.  Tour Pro is the very first true cable steer motor with GPS anchor in the industry.  

“We are excited about the launch of The Tour and Tour Pro,” said Kevin Read, MotorGuide senior product manager. “MotorGuide has been on the water since 1947 and we can officially say with these motors: The Tour is Back!  These motors have been redesigned from prop to pedal to be the highest performing trolling motors on the market.”

Both Tour and Tour Pro are built for tough conditions with a full 360-degree breakaway mount with integrated bounce buster and a rugged two-piece shaft with metal outer column and composite inner shaft. In addition, both models include a no-flex metal foot pedal that provides the most solid steering in the market. Tour Pro models combine Pinpoint GPS, the most accurate GPS anchor available, with traditional pull-pull stainless steel cables for smooth, responsive steering.

“Our new Tour Series will be the only trolling motors that offer the responsiveness and durability of a true cable steer motor with all the benefits of GPS anchoring,” Read said. “MotorGuide continues to make the most durable, reliable, and easy to use trolling motors on the market so you can make the most of your time on the water.​”

The new motors will include MotorGuide’s Zero-G lift assist system, which requires half of the effort compared to the competition, as well as the new Katana propeller – a Mercury designed two-blade weedless prop that delivers more power and up to 30% more battery efficiency than previous props.

Both models also offer options for MotorGuide’s new HD+ universal sonar with both traditional 2D views and high-definition down looking views compatible with most major fishfinder brands. “We believe in giving our customers the freedom to connect to their fishfinder of choice,” Read said. “Our new HD+ sonar technology will offer compatibility with all major sonar brands so you aren’t limited to just one option.” In addition to sonar compatibility, Tour Pro models with integrated PinPoint GPS also offer chartplotter integration for connecting to Lowrance, Simrad, and Mercury Vessel view displays for autopilot and navigation control.     

Tour and Tour Pro will be offered in 82 or 109-pound thrust models, at either 24 or 36 volts with 45-inch shafts.  Tour and Tour Pro will be available for consumers to purchase by January 2020.  

About MotorGuide
Based in Lowell, Michigan, MotorGuide trolling motors are built to live up to the willful determination of the fisherman, through purpose-driven design, intentional features, and reliability that keeps fishermen on the water longer. More information can be found at MotorGuide.com.

2 Replies to “Motorguide Introduces true cable steer motor with GPS anchor”

  1. You can tell the men from the boys by the price of their toys!

    Bold Moves! Top Brands! Innovation! New Motors! More Power! Faster Action! and Higher Speeds! Yes indeed, the MotorGuide Tour and Tour Pro Trolling Motor is certainly state of the art as they profess.

    As everyone well knows, I also like “making waves” in the universal realm of the fishing industry. What continues to stick in my craw is the constant misconception made by many anglers and manufactures of marine electronics, in reference to what is actually a “fish finder”.

    Rightly so, whether this is a result of an innocent rearrangement of the facts or not, there seems to be quite a bit of ongoing nomenclature “muddying the waters”, so to speak.

    An example of such is indelibly included in the above article and I quote:

    “Both models also offer options for MotorGuide’s new HD+ universal sonar with both traditional 2D views and high-definition down looking views compatible with most major fishfinder brands. “We believe in giving our customers the freedom to connect to their fishfinder of choice,” Read said. “Our new HD+ sonar technology will offer compatibility with all major sonar brands so you aren’t limited to just one option.” In addition to sonar compatibility, Tour Pro models with integrated PinPoint GPS also offer chartplotter integration for connecting to Lowrance, Simrad, and Mercury Vessel view displays for autopilot and navigation control.” ….Unquote.

    Fishfinder is mentioned on 2 occasions and Sonar 3 times. Likely, people in the industry are having some difficulty understanding the logic behind the statement, “One’s ability to cipher a numeric code is not in the mathematical equation itself, but in one’s own intelligence to perceive the unknown.”

    Being a former Sonarman myself in the Royal Canadian Navy, I have indicated many times over the years the difference between a Fish Finder and Sonar. The operation of these two units are definitely at opposite ends of the spectrum. The backlash I received was understandable but I will lay it all out for you again.

    Sonar (originally an acronym for SOund NAvigation and Ranging). It is a technique that uses sound propagation (usually underwater, as in submarine navigation) to navigate, communicate with or detect objects on or under the surface of the water, such as other vessels. Two types of technology share the name “sonar”: passive sonar is essentially listening for the sound made by vessels; active sonar is emitting pulses of sounds and listening for echoes. Sonar may be used as a means of acoustic location and of measurement of the echo characteristics of “targets” in the water.

    Therefore without further ado and knowing full well that manufactures of Fish Finding Electronics specifically state that these units should NEVER be used for navigational purposes, I would like to challenge all anglers and every manufacturer of marine technology to prove these units do transmit any type of audible of sound.

    As I well know, the price of your toys certainly has it’s benefits!

  2. “Echo bearing 270, Sir!

    It is quite apparent that I should have the attention of my “target” audience by now. Just in case the “echo pitch” was a little off frequency I will “ping” out those scientific facts once again for you to mull over while considering how to best reply to my challenge that Fish Finders do not propagate (produce) sound.

    Unknown to many, sonar is actually detrimental to many forms of marine life being that it interferes with their own natural sonar. Mammals such as whales, dolphins and the like use their sonar (squeaks and grunts) to communicate among themselves and to locate prey. The sound they produce can travel for several miles/kilometres. Water in this instance is an excellent conductor of sound waves.

    Fish of every species are also super sensitive to sound. Detecting vibrations is one of their main means of defence and communication. Boat motors and other noise produced from moving around in your vessel will cause them to panic and scatter, as we are all aware.

    Point of Order : Hearing is an important sensory system for most species of fish. Hearing threshold and the ability to localize sound sources are reduced underwater, in which the speed of sound is faster than in air. Underwater hearing is by bone conduction, and localization of sound appears to depend on differences in amplitude detected by bone conduction. As such, aquatic animals such as fish have a more specialized hearing apparatus that is effective underwater.

    Fish can sense sound through their lateral lines and their otoliths (ears). Some fishes, such as some species of carp and herring, hear through their swim bladders, which function rather like a hearing aid.

    Hearing is well-developed in carp, which have the Weberian organ, three specialized vertebral processes that transfer vibrations in the swim bladder to the inner ear.

    Although it is hard to test sharks’ hearing, they may have a sharp sense of hearing and can possibly hear prey many miles away. A small opening on each side of their heads (not the spiracle) leads directly into the inner ear through a thin channel. The lateral line shows a similar arrangement, and is open to the environment via a series of openings called lateral line pores. This is a reminder of the common origin of these two vibration- and sound-detecting organs that are grouped together as the acoustico-lateralis system. In bony fish and tetrapods the external opening into the inner ear has been lost.

    Now with those facts in mind, if these manufacturers of marine electronic technology truly believe their products are indeed sonar, these units would in fact repel every species of fish known to man. It would make it impossible to catch fish which would render these units useless.

    So all you Landlubbers, “Is there an echo in here?!

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